Orrin in the winners’ circle again with Lagonda

first_img31 May 2013 Orrin in the winners’ circle again with Lagonda Max Orrin secured his second major victory in the space of three weeks when he won the Lagonda Trophy on a wet and dreary day at The Gog Magog Golf Club near Cambridge. The England boy international from Kent posted a final round of 70 for 270, ten under par, and a two-shot winning margin over Robert Sutton and three better than his county colleague Mark Collins. In early May, Orrin (image copyright Tom Ward) came from several shots back to win the South East of England Links Championship at Royal Cinque Ports. This time he shared the lead with Sutton going into the second and final day but forged ahead to collect the title. It was his third round 65 that proved crucial to Orrin’s success. “That was the key to the win,” he said. “But I played solidly throughout and putted well. “I’ve worked hard all winter on my short game. In the conditions we’ve faced so far this year it is important to get this part of the game right. It’s been the biggest improvement in my game this year.” With Sutton, one of his playing partners, taking 67 in round three, Orrin went into the final circuit two strokes ahead and although both swopped birdies on the final afternoon, he stayed there, confirming he can lead from the front as well as challenging from behind. “It was nice to be in the last group in an event,” added the 19 year old from the North Foreland club. “I’d not been in that position for a while and had not had the pressure to close out a tournament. So it is nice to know I can do it when leading.” With Collins finishing third and Michael Saunders fifth, it meant Kent had three players in the top five while Wiltshire’s Josh Loughrey was fourth on 276, having shared the first round lead with Collins on 66. Leading final scores: 270 M Orrin (North Foreland) 68 67 65 70 272 R Sutton (Dunstable Downs) 66 69 67 70 273 M Collins (Chart Hills) 68 68 67 70 276 J Loughrey (Wrag Barn) 66 70 69 71 278 M Saunders (Dartford) 69 67 74 68 280 M Kippen (Enmore Park) 71 68 71 70last_img read more

Lasting Touch Memorials Explains Why it’s Important to Understand Cemetery Regulations

first_imgFacebook6Tweet0Pin0 This may sound strange, but when it comes to cemeteries, one size doesn’t fit all. Each cemetery has its own rules concerning the type of memorials allowed.“Some require concrete only foundations and some require granite only foundations,” says Lasting Touch Memorial Memorials owner, Tony Ward. Cemeteries are so picky as to dictate what type of flower vases can be used on the premises.There are reasons for the different regulations. Some of it has to do with local code. However, the biggest reasons are upkeep and aesthetics. Private cemeteries tend to favor flat grass markers because they’re easier to mow around than a statue.Knowing these details in advance is important because they can impact the type of monument you choose for your loved one and possibly even where he or she will be buried.Ward tells me the story of a family whose grandmother was buried at Gethsemane Cemetery in Federal Way. “The family chose a nice upright and I asked them if the cemetery allowed it.” The family said yes but Ward double checked just to be sure. Turns out the grandmother’s grave sat on the border. The plots next to hers could have uprights but she couldn’t.Fortunately, Ward has a good relationship with cemeteries in the area. He’s also been in the business for more than 25 years so he knows most of this stuff by heart. Still, it’s a good idea to find out the rules and regulations for the cemetery where you or your loved one are going to be placed.If you have questions about picking a memorial call Tony Ward at 360-458-9070 or visit the Lasting Touch website by following the link.last_img read more

Community Resources is Now Hiring

first_imgFacebook30Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Community ResourcesCommunity Resources is a small, locally-owned business located in Olympia. We are dedicated to serving the needs of adults with disabilities and elders in the South Puget Sound region through a variety of flexible programs and contracts by building relationships based on support for each other through mutual learning, loving, healing and acceptance.Community Resources is now hiring full and part-time employees. Find satisfaction in a dynamic job assisting adults with developmental disabilities and build invaluable communication, health and money management skills. Channel your creative energy to find inventive and effective ways to help others.We take a person-centered approach in designing our work, focusing on the unique goals, communication styles, and needs of the people we support.Join our team to support individuals to lead rich lives rooted in their passions, cultivate relationships that are meaningful to them, and maintain all aspects of individual health.Minimum requirements Applicants must:Be at least 18 years of age.Have a high school diploma/GED.Be able to pass a background check.Possess a current driver’s license and a vehicle with minimal liability insurance.Be willing to use personal vehicle for work purposes.Must have open availability.Pay Structure:0 to 4 months $10.00 introductory wage5th month of employment $10.25 an hour8th month of employment bonus up to $250.00Apply in person:Monday – Friday, 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM,at 208 West Bay Dr. NW Olympia,or direct your question to Terrie Mount-Fouth @ (360) 943-6257ext. 106last_img read more

Stewarts’ Farm Sanctuary Proposal Takes Seed

first_imgBy Joseph SapiaCOLTS NECK – Entertainer Jon Stewart and his wife, Tracey, have moved closer to turning the historic Hockhockson Farm on Route 537 into an agricultural sanctuary-education center.On Tuesday, the Monmouth County Agriculture Development Board voted unanimously to declare the 45-acre Hockhockson Farm, now operating with horse boarding and the growing of vegetables and flowers, a commercial farm.When the board reached its meeting curfew of 10 p.m., it tabled the remainder of the application until its next meeting, May 3 – to be heard at the same location and time, 7:30 p.m. at the Monmouth County Agricultural Building, 4000 Kozloski Road, Freehold Township.At that time, the board will deliberate whether the sanctuary’s education-visitor center, which is not allowed in the township’s agriculture zone, would be a legitimate part of the farming operation. If the board approves, the application would bypass a township variance needed for the zoning and move to the township Planning Board for site plan approval.William Potter, chair of the Agriculture Development Board, said the board “most likely” would decide the matter at the next meeting.The Stewarts, a Red Bank couple applying as the JTS Land Trust, hope to begin operating the sanctuary in the spring of 2017, according to Tracey Stewart. Jon Stewart, the former host of the popular “Daily Show” on Comedy Central television, was not at the meeting.JTS Land Trust is the contract-purchaser of the Hockhockson Farm, which is owned by the Cooke family. Robert Cooke III, who lives on the farm, testified his family has owned the farm a “couple hundred years.”Tuesday’s 2-1/2-hour hearing, attended by about 20 members of the public, combined a presentation of the applicants, JTS and Hockhockson Farm; questions from the board; public comments supporting the application; and concerns raised by the township.Robert Cooke III, an owner of Colts Neck’s Hockhockson Farm, at a meeting of the Monmouth County Agriculture Development Board. His family has owned the farm for a “couple hundred years,” Cooke said.Basically, the township is concerned about losing control over the building of the education-visitor center – proposed as 8,400 square feet over two floors– and any other parts of the application; that tenant farmer Robert Laurino, rather than the farm owner, was providing financial statements toward the farm qualifying commercially; and that a movie/TV studio, once talked about but not longer in the plans, be specifically excluded if the board grants a Site-Specific Agricultural Management Practice (SSAMP).In discussing whether Hochhockson Farm, which sits between Laird and Swimming River Roads, qualifies as a commercial farm, various board members expressed no doubt.“I feel it meets the criteria of a commercial farm,” said board member Gary DeFelice.“I think it clearly does fit,” added board member Nancy Grbelja.The vote was 10 to 0 in favor. Board member J. David Holmes, an Upper Freehold farmer, recused himself from hearing the application because he has sold hay to the Stewarts.“I might not have had to recuse myself,” Holmes said. “(But) just on the safe side, I did.”After the farm was declared commercial, the hearing moved more on to what the Stewarts plan there – growing crops and protecting farm animals, while educating visitors on farming and healthy eating.“The goal of the farm is to be excited to see where food is coming from,” said Tracey Stewart, a former veterinary technician who lived on a farm as a child. “I do think of a farm as a perfect classroom.”“Adorable animals” are a way to draw people to the facility, she said. Anticipated living at the farm would be four to six cows, two to four pigs, six to 10 sheep, six to 10 goats, two to four horses and up to 50 chickens, according to JTS’s application.Tracey Stewart said the farm will not be a rescue facility, per se. Instead, it will be getting animals from the New York State-based Farm Sanctuary, which rescues animals.“We’ll be getting the cream of the crop,” Tracey Stewart said.The new education-visitors center will be part of the hub of the farm, or just beyond the main farmhouse.The farmhouse, whose oldest section dates to the late 1700s, will not be modernized and, therefore, not be available for general public access. Instead, it will be generally off-limits – regarded, according to Tracey Stewart, “as a fragile piece of history.”In response to a question from DeFelice about whether the education provided would be detrimental to traditional animal production on farms, Tracey Stewart said no.“I might have something different on my plate, but we’re all sitting at the same table,” she said.Tracey Stewart said the plan is to keep Laurino farming the property – “Absolutely, we need him,” she said – and no standing buildings on the farm are to be demolished.Colts Neck officials questioned whether the JTS and Hockhockson Farm application was in the right place – before the Agriculture Development Board, rather than the township Planning or Zoning boards.The township officials sought more detailed plans, beyond conceptual ideas.“We’ve heard a lot of concepts, but the devil is in the details,” said Township Attorney Joseph Clark.“We’re not adverse to the concept, we’re adverse to the process,” said Deputy Mayor Michael Fitzgerald. “There must be a reason they didn’t come to us first (at the township level). They lawyered up and came to you.”“I built my house there, I had to follow the rules from Colts Neck,” said John Young, who lives next to Hockhockson Farm.But Sue Fulton of Asbury Park told the board any question of process – the county Agriculture Development Board being the wrong place – “flies in the face of what you’re here to do.”“You need to keep farming around here,” said John Kissel, a township resident expressing his support. “You have to have farming or else you have developments, otherwise you have schools to pay for.”Former Tinton Falls Mayor Mike Skudera, who lives near the farm, expressed his support.“I’m excited about this idea,” said Jason Saleh of Little Silver. “I just want to voice my support for this.”Early in the hearing, Cooke explained how the farm was once 290 acres, but downsized a few times. From the time his grandfather ran the farm to now, it has had various uses: cattle, Christmas trees, flowers, hay, straw, horses. A farm stand has been on the property on and off since the mid-1980s, Cooke said.The Stewarts own a farm in Middletown, but it is only about 12 acres, or about one-third the size of Hockhockson Farm, said their lawyer, Philip San Filippo.last_img read more

JHTA to host charity golf tournament

first_imgThe Jamaica Hotel and Tourist Association (JHTA) will host its fourth annual charity golf tournament at Cinnamon Hill, Sunday, April 17.The event, led by the Montego Bay chapter of the JHTA, attracts hundreds of amateur and pro golfers.”The tournament raises funds for a number of charities across Montego Bay, including Save the Child, Montego Bay Freeport Project, and House Number 10 at the SOS Children’s Village,” said Omar Robinson, vice-president, JHTA.”Through proceeds raised from the tournament, we have been able to do remarkable work in these institutions, along with the Tower Hill Basic School, where more than $2 million was spent to renovate the Tower Hill Basic School. That work aligns perfectly with the JHTA’s corporate social-responsibility values and our tradition of supporting the nation’s more vulnerable, and those who support them,” he added.CORPORATE MINGLEThe event will continue into the evening with a corporate mingle featuring special performances by Cindy Lewis, formerly of Byron Lee and the Dragonnaires, and the Bung Guh Lhung Steel Band.Last year there were 56 participants at the tournament.The JHTA Charity Golf Tournament is one of the premier tournaments on the island, with numerous prizes, including all-inclusive weekends, passes to various attractions, dinners, day passes, trophies, among other prizes on offer. This year a new trophy will be issued to the winning hotel team.The tournament is being billed as a family event with something for everyone, including a kiddies corner. It kicks off at 8:30 a.m. with organisations being encouraged to submit their entries by contacting the JHTA’s Montego Bay Chapter.last_img read more

Around Whittier

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREPettersson scores another winner, Canucks beat KingsDon’t toss that cell phone; donate it NORWALK – The Norwalk Senior Center’s PREP (Phone Recycling Enhancement Program) has been successful in keeping more than 300 cell phones out of landfills. More than $400 has been raised from recycling used cell phones to enhance programming at the center. The center is still collecting. Phones can be turned in at the center from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, or 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at 14040 San Antonio Drive. The Norwalk City Hall, Norwalk Social Service Center and the Arts and Sports Complex are also drop sites. SOUTH EL MONTE – The 19th annual Bill Bell Bird Walk will be held at 8 a.m. Dec. 15 at the Whittier Narrows Nature Center, 1000 N. Durfee Ave. Although Bell retired as editor of the Whittier Daily News in July, the Whittier Area Chapter of the National Audubon Society will continue with the bird walk and Bell will continue to participate this year, said Cathy Walters, chapter president and leader of the event. The group will meet in the Nature Center parking lot. Participants need not be experienced birders. The walk, which lasts 90 minutes to two hours, will be followed by light refreshments in the Nature Center building. Participants should dress comfortably and casually. Bring binoculars or scopes if you have them, but the regular birders are quite generous in sharing their expertise and views of birds through their scopes, said audubon officer Linda Oberholtzer. Don’t toss that cell phone; donate it NORWALK – The Norwalk Senior Center’s PREP (Phone Recycling Enhancement Program) has been successful in keeping more than 300 cell phones out of landfills. More than $400 has been raised from recycling used cell phones to enhance programming at the center. The center is still collecting. Phones can be turned in at the center from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, or 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at 14040 San Antonio Drive. The Norwalk City Hall, Norwalk Social Service Center and the Arts and Sports Complex are also drop sites. The program is sponsored by the National Council on Aging, the National Institute of Senior Centers, the Norwalk Senior Commission and the city of Norwalk. For information, call (562) 929-5580. Adoption meetings open to families LOS ANGELES – Families curious about open adoption are invited to attend an adoption information session sponsored by the Independent Adoption Center, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 12 at the IAC’s Los Angeles office at 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 1450. At the session, an experienced adoption professional will discuss open adoption from the initial stages through finalization. Parents who have recently adopted will share their experience and take questions. Reservations are required. For information or to make reservations, call (800) 571-2913. University Women to host boutique LA HABRA HEIGHTS – The holiday luncheon meeting of the Whittier Branch of the American Association of University Women, together with the Montebello and Brea/La Habra branches, will be at 11 a.m. Dec. 15 at the Hacienda Golf Club, 718 East Road. A boutique featuring a large selection of handcrafted products such as scarves, dolls tea cozies, Christmas ornaments and baked goods, as well as “regifted” items, will precede the luncheon. Seasonal entertainment will be provided by the Tapestry Hand Bell Choir. Cost is $25. Reservations may be made by Saturday by e-mail at [email protected] or by phone at (562) 693-8535. Seniors eligible for free shots LA MIRADA – The city of La Mirada, in conjunction with the Los Angeles Department of Health and Human Services and the Red Cross, will be offering free flu shots for seniors ages 50 and older, and those who have a chronic illness. Flu shots will be given from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday at the La Mirada Activity Center, 13810 La Mirada Blvd. Participants must call to register for an appointment this year. For information, call the La Mirada Activity Center at (562) 902-3160 or visit cityoflamirada.org. District board sets special meeting SANTA FE SPRINGS – The Little Lake City School District Board of Education has scheduled a special meeting at 1 p.m. Tuesday in the District Office Board Room, 10515 S. Pioneer Blvd. The purpose of the meeting is the presentation of school plans for the 2007-08 school year. The meeting is open to the public. – From staff reports 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The program is sponsored by the National Council on Aging, the National Institute of Senior Centers, the Norwalk Senior Commission and the city of Norwalk. For information, call (562) 929-5580. Adoption meetings open to families LOS ANGELES – Families curious about open adoption are invited to attend an adoption information session sponsored by the Independent Adoption Center, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 12 at the IAC’s Los Angeles office at 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 1450. At the session, an experienced adoption professional will discuss open adoption from the initial stages through finalization. Parents who have recently adopted will share their experience and take questions. Reservations are required. For information or to make reservations, call (800) 571-2913. University Women to host boutique LA HABRA HEIGHTS – The holiday luncheon meeting of the Whittier Branch of the American Association of University Women, together with the Montebello and Brea/La Habra branches, will be at 11 a.m. Dec. 15 at the Hacienda Golf Club, 718 East Road. A boutique featuring a large selection of handcrafted products such as scarves, dolls tea cozies, Christmas ornaments and baked goods, as well as “regifted” items, will precede the luncheon. Seasonal entertainment will be provided by the Tapestry Hand Bell Choir. Cost is $25. Reservations may be made by Saturday by e-mail at [email protected] or by phone at (562) 693-8535. Seniors eligible for free shots LA MIRADA – The city of La Mirada, in conjunction with the Los Angeles Department of Health and Human Services and the Red Cross, will be offering free flu shots for seniors ages 50 and older, and those who have a chronic illness. Flu shots will be given from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday at the La Mirada Activity Center, 13810 La Mirada Blvd. Participants must call to register for an appointment this year. For information, call the La Mirada Activity Center at (562) 902-3160 or visit cityoflamirada.org. District board sets special meeting SANTA FE SPRINGS – The Little Lake City School District Board of Education has scheduled a special meeting at 1 p.m. Tuesday in the District Office Board Room, 10515 S. Pioneer Blvd. The purpose of the meeting is the presentation of school plans for the 2007-08 school year. The meeting is open to the public. – From staff reports 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!,SOUTH EL MONTE – The 19th annual Bill Bell Bird Walk will be held at 8 a.m. Dec. 15 at the Whittier Narrows Nature Center, 1000 N. Durfee Ave. Although Bell retired as editor of the Whittier Daily News in July, the Whittier Area Chapter of the National Audubon Society will continue with the bird walk and Bell will continue to participate this year, said Cathy Walters, chapter president and leader of the event. The group will meet in the Nature Center parking lot. Participants need not be experienced birders. The walk, which lasts 90 minutes to two hours, will be followed by light refreshments in the Nature Center building. Participants should dress comfortably and casually. Bring binoculars or scopes if you have them, but the regular birders are quite generous in sharing their expertise and views of birds through their scopes, said audubon officer Linda Oberholtzer. last_img read more

Chelsea youngsters score late goal to continue remarkable run

first_imgChelsea’s youngsters maintained their 13-match unbeaten run after Lewis Baker snatched a 2-2 draw with an injury-time penalty against Reading in the Under-21 Premier League.The visitors started well and Dermot Drummy’s side were 2-0 down at the break but hit back through Andreas Christensen’s goal early in the second half.And Baker, who recently made his first-team debut for the Blues, fired home from the spot following a handball to complete the comeback.The team have scored a total of 18 goals in their last five matches.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Cells Manage Stress and Death

first_imgLike soldiers in a foreign land, cells sometimes find themselves in unexpected situations.  Key equipment breaks down, or the environment puts stress on their resources.  Without the ability to adapt, they could perish – and in worst-case scenarios they must, like a squadron under ambush with no way out.  In such cases, like spies carrying cyanide vials, cells commit orderly suicide for the good of the organism.  Two papers in Science describe how cells do it.    DNA damage is like an emergency in the field.  Fortunately, cells have elaborate procedures for dealing with it, like a flowchart, where remaining resources adapt and fix the damage.  Israeli scientists Friedman and Schuldiner,1 summarizing a paper in the same issue of Science,2 described the “DNA Damage Road Map.”  Bandyopadhyay et al had “discovered widespread changes in genetic interaction among yeast kinases, phosphatases, and transcription factors as the cell responds to DNA damage.”  The technique they used was like turning still pictures into a movie: “Differential interactions uncover many gene functions that go undetected in static conditions.”  Notably, “The data also reveal that protein complexes are generally stable in response to perturbation, but the functional relations between these complexes are substantially reorganized.”    Friedman and Schuldiner described how the team had put yeast cells under stress by adding methyl methanesulfonate, a DNA-damaging agent, and watched how they behaved differently from those in a stable environment.  The genetic networks reorganized themselves to handle the situation; “A bird’s-eye view of the dE-MAP reveals that protein complexes tended to remain stable across the two conditions,” they said.  “The relationships between these complexes, however, were reprogrammed to assist the cell in dealing with stress.”  For instance, a transcription factor affected “cell cycle checkpoints (which ensure the fidelity of cell division).”  Being able to see networks respond in sequence represents a new frontier in biochemistry, they said.  What’s more, “There are hundreds of such stories in the data.”    Sometimes, when the stress is too great, death is the only option.  Every day in your body, millions of cells die due to stress, injury, infection, or “the natural cell turnover process that is essential to optimal tissue functioning.  That’s what Seamus J. Martin said in another Perspective piece in Science,3 describing how Ren et al, in the same issue,4 helped to resolve how cells execute the orderly process of cell suicide, called apoptosis.  “A cell must commit suicide at the appropriate time, otherwise malfunctioning or damaged cells could accumulate and lead to tumor development and other pathological conditions,” Martin said.  “Thus, sensors are needed to monitor the integrity of cellular functions and relay this information to the cell death machinery.”    What Ren et al found is a “battery of sensors” that “detect cellular stress or damage through transcriptional or posttranslational mechanisms,” Martin said.  He described what happens when the suicide alarm sounds: Upon activation, Bh3-only proteins provoke permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane, allowing release of cytochrome c to the cytosol.  This efflux triggers assembly of the apoptosome, a structure that sets in motion a proteolytic cascade that coordinates cell death through destruction of hundreds of proteins (see the figure).  Because of their ability to unlock this cellular poison cabinet, Bh3-only proteins have come under intensive scrutiny.  How do these proteins provoke cytochrome c efflux?    Bax and Bak, proteins that either reside in or insert into mitochondrial membranes, constitute the pore or channel that permeabilizes mitochondria.  Loss of Bax and Bak renders cells resistant to permeabilization (and subsequent apoptosis) caused by Bh3-only proteins.  Upon activation, Bh3-only proteins promote oligomerization of Bax and Bak within the mitochondrial outer membrane.  Thus, opening of the resultant channel effectively constitutes the decision to commit cellular suicide.In other words, the sensors open the gates to prisoners who call the cellular council to assemble a death machine, which holds the keys to a poison cabinet.  During the process, a debate between pro-survival agents and death agents act like guards at the mitochondrial membrane checking one another’s credentials.  “Thus, Bh3-only proteins and prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins represent opposing forces in the struggle to control the channel, the outcome of which dictates whether a cell will live or die.”  A checking of codes in a nuclear weapons activation process comes to mind.  “Because of the deadly consequences of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, this major checkpoint on the road to cell death is heavily policed,” Martin said.  When death is the only option remaining, it occurs in an orderly, systematic manner that leaves the rest of the organism at less risk.    For more on apoptosis (programmed cell death), see 04/09/2002, 06/27/2003, 01/05/2006, 07/25/2006, 03/17/2007 and 08/14/2007.1.  Nir Friedman and Maya Schuldiner, “Genetics: The DNA Damage Road Map,” Science, 3 December 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6009 pp. 1327-1328, DOI: 10.1126/science.1199862.2.  Bandyopadhyay et al, “Rewiring of Genetic Networks in Response to DNA Damage,” Science, 3 December 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6009 pp. 1385-1389, DOI: 10.1126/science.1195618.3.  Seamus J. Martin, “Cell Biology: Opening the Cellular Poison Cabinet,” Science, 3 December 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6009 pp. 1330-1331, DOI: 10.1126/science.1199461.4.  Ren et al, “BID, BIM, and PUMA Are Essential for Activation of the BAX- and BAK-Dependent Cell Death Program,” Science, 3 December 2010: Vol. 330 no. 6009 pp. 1390-1393, DOI: 10.1126/science.1190217.Did you have any idea of the drama occurring inside your body millions of times a day?  Your cells are constantly struggling against real foes: genetic mistakes, toxins, environmental stress, injury, infection, and overcrowding.  Fortunately, there are elaborate policies and procedures, with police and programs, knowing how to handle each situation.  None of these papers said anything about evolution.  No wonder; this all sounds so much like intelligent design, it brings to mind images of cellular governments with documented foreign policy and homeland security systems.  And the first paper was talking about yeast cells!    How on earth can anyone continue holding on to a doctrine like Darwinism that was concocted by a guru (02/15/2004 commentary) who knew nothing of what was happening in the little globs of protoplasm mischaracterized by the scientists of his day?  Martin talked about information being conveyed by these cellular agents, leading to decisions.  The other papers talked about whole networks of information adapting to change by adjusting their interactions – including assessing the extent of damage, accelerating or repressing gene translation, and striving to maintain stability in response to stress.  Only two things on earth we know of do that kind of thing: human minds, and robotic systems programmed by human minds.  But human minds did not program the cell.  What does that imply?  Think, now, those of you who consider yourselves heirs of the Age of Reason.(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Transnet in ‘landmark’ R5bn bond issue

first_img8 November 2013South African state company Transnet issued a R5-billion bond registered with the London Stock Exchange on Thursday, becoming the first African company to list a local currency-denominated bond on the international capital markets.Transnet will use the proceeds of the bond to fund part of its seven-year, R307-billion infrastructure investment programme to expand South Africa’s rail, port and pipeline infrastructure.The placement of the bond, following successful roadshows by Transnet in the UK and US, “confirms South Africa as one of the leading investment destinations among emerging markets and provides a much needed boost for investment inflows,” Transnet said in a statement on Thursday.At the same time, the landmark issuance “confirms Transnet’s improved credit standing and investor confidence in the company’s ability to execute programmes under our audacious market demand strategy”.Ratings agency Fitch Ratings last week upgraded Transnet’s credit rating from “BB+” to “BBB”. Transnet said this affirmed its ability to raise funds in the market “on the strength of its balance sheet without government guarantees, allowing the fiscus to channel its resources towards the country’s other pressing needs”.Transnet’s latest bond was issued at a yield of 9.5 percent and will mature in 2021. It is the third successful bond issuance Transnet has made to meet its infrastructure investment funding requirement, and means that the company has now met its R15.6-billion funding requirement for the current financial year.All three bonds were issued on the strength of Transnet’s balance sheet, with no government guarantees required.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Toronto and US stock markets in the red at latemorning loonie edges

first_imgTORONTO — Canada’s main stock index edged lower amid losses in the key materials sector and the health-care sector, which includes many of the country’s big marijuana companies.The S&P/TSX composite index was down 15.32 points at 15,116.46.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 51.80 points at 25,234.69. The S&P 500 index was down 3.13 points at 2,719.05, while the Nasdaq composite was down 19.01 points at 7,181.87.The Canadian dollar traded for 75.57 cents US compared with an average of 75.52 on Tuesday.The December crude contract was up US$1.30 at US$56.99 per barrel and the December natural gas contract was up 44.5 cents at US$4.55 per mmBTU.The December gold contract was up 20 cents at US$1,201.60 an ounce and the December copper contract was up 2.15 cents at US$2.71 a pound.The Canadian Presslast_img read more